Spine News

Cold Plasma Leads to Increased Bone Formation

May the force be with your bones…the future is most definitely here. New research has found that cold plasma—the stuff of televisions and fluorescent lights—could actually help bones heal faster. The work was published August 11 in the Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

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OrthoPediatrics Rolls Out BandLoc System

OrthoPediatrics Corp. has launched its new BandLoc 5.5/6.0mm System (BandLoc), a device which has already received both CE marking and FDA clearance and specific international markets. According to the August 16, 2016 company news release, “BandLoc is a pedicle-sparing, band passage technique for treating a wide variety of complex spinal pathologies, including scoliosis.

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Trial to Study Ultra-High Antibiotic Bone Cement CERAMENT G

BONESUPPORT, a biotech company located in the Ideon Science Park at Lund, Skåne, Sweden has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to begin an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study of its product CERAMENT G.

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FDA Clears DeGen Medical’s Connector

DeGen Medical, Inc., a Florence, South Carolina-based medical device company has received FDA clearance for its CONNECT-L™ Transverse Connector to be used with its F1 Modular Pedicle Screw System (MPS). The F1 MPS™ System is intended to provide immobilization and stabilization of the posterior non-cervical spine.

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Vertical Spine: 1000th Case Using FIBRINET

Gathering more and more data, Vertical Spine, LLC has now announced the achievement of a key milestone with the 1000th case performed using its FIBRINET System technology.

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Endoscopic Spine Surgery Society Formed

There’s another spine society. This new spine society is focusing on endoscopic spine surgery. On July 13, 2016, spine surgeons from Frederick, Maryland-based American Spine announced the formation of the International Society of Endoscopic Spine Surgery (ISESS).
The mission behind the new society, according to a press release, is that it would “not be driven by any one person, company or country.”

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Low Back Pain: Mesoblast Receives Best Basic Science Award

Mesoblast Limited has announced that the 24-month results from the 100-patient, four-arm, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 2 trial of its chronic low back pain (CLBP) product candidate MPC-06-ID were presented at the 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Spine Intervention Society (SIS) held in New Orleans July 27-30, and received the 2016 Best Basic Science Abstract award at the meeting.

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Broken Wrists Signal Elevated Hip, Spine Fracture Risk

A study published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery reveals that 15% of women over the age of 50 fall and fracture a wrist. A broken wrist is bad enough, but the wrist fracture is like a cannery in a coal mine. It signals the presence of balance problems and the possibility of another fall that could fracture a hip.

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Orthopedists Top Paid Of 23 Specialties

Orthopedic surgeons, who earn a median annual salary of $555,000, top the list of the highest paid among 23 medical specialties, according to Joseph Conn, writing for Modern Healthcare, which recently completed its 23rd annual Physician Compensation Survey covering 6,500 healthcare organizations and almost 346,000 physicians.

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Trinity Bone Graft Shows 93.5% Fusion Rate in High Risk Patients

Orthofix International N.V.’s Trinity Evolution bone graft showed 93.5% fusion rates at 12 months and 78.6% at six months in a 12-month study of patients who underwent single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in combination with a PEEK interbody spacer and supplemental anterior fixation.

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Intellirod Spine: $1 Million for Wireless Sensors

Curious about the strain being put on that spine implant? So was Intellirod Spine. The company has just announced that it has raised more than $1 million in equity financing from new and existing investors to do that and more.

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New Drugs for Spinal Muscular Atrophy?

Researchers at the University of Missouri are testing a new molecule that has proven to be highly effective in animal models exhibiting spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The researchers hope their work will eventually result in new drugs for patients with SMA.

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Spinal Cord Damage: New Rehab Treatment?

Conducted at the BioMag laboratory at the Helsinki University Hospital, a new patient study could open a new opportunity to rehabilitate patients with spinal cord damage. Anastasia Shulga, M.D. is a neurologist who led the study, in which, according to the July 17, 2016 news release, “two patients with spinal cord injuries received a form of treatment that combined transcranial magnetic stimulation with simultaneous peripheral nerve stimulation given repeatedly for nearly six months.

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NASA Study May Help Osteoporosis Patients

After some special mice return from a trip in space, Rick Sumner, Ph.D. and colleagues will be using them to get more information on molecular basis of bone loss in space. Dr. Sumner, chairperson of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Rush University, is highly involved in the NASA-funded study, which according to the July 18, 2016 news release will attempt to, “…identify changes that occur in the activity of osteocyte cells during space flights. It will try to determine which genes inside osteocytes get turned on or off when there’s no gravity, thus secreting more or less of a protein. It also will explore how these molecular changes are linked to decreases in bone density and strength.”

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